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Career success is an “inside-out” process. If you dedicate yourself to a careful self-assessment before you launch your next job search, you will find yourself in an elite group of professionals who know what they want, know what they have to offer, and know where their careers are taking them.

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Your resume is the single most important marketing tool you have. This book covers the most important topics you will need to master in order to create a military to civilian career change resume that attracts attention and job offers. 


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Self-Marketing for Military to Civilian Career Transitions looks at the new context of work with its universal entrepreneurial culture. Whether you own your own business or are part of a giant multi-national corporation, you can’t afford to think of yourself or your career in any other terms. 

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Entries in what is networking (1)

Wednesday
Jun202012

What is Networking: Use LinkedIn to Build Your Reference List

Do you keep an updated list of potential references? Based on our career consulting experience we find that the most common answer is "no." It can be difficult to keep in touch with past supervisors and colleagues and it only takes a few years for detailed specifics about your work at the organization to get a bit fuzzy or lost. As such, quality references can be difficult to get.

Additionally, many job seekers we've worked with -- particularly those that are currently employed -- have simply put "References Available Upon Request" at the bottom of their resume. Inevitably, when they get the follow-up request for the actual contacts, they end up scrambling to find 2-3 people available to speak about their work. Calling up an old colleague or boss out of the blue to ask for a reference can be a bit off-putting -- for both you and the potential referrer.

This is where LinkedIn comes in handy.
The best time to ask for a reference from a previous colleague or supervisor is when you don't actually need one; when you have 4-6 months to make initial contact with an old colleague, connect on LinkedIn and casually request a recommendation. The best part about LinkedIn is that you can do it all online.

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